Featuring America's Home Inspector: Nationally Syndicated Columnist, Barry Stone

The House Detective by Barry Stone, Certified Home Inspector

Dear Barry: We recently purchased a home. During the negotiations, we asked the sellers to replace the electrical panel due to safety concerns disclosed by our home inspector. The sellers agreed to have this work done. On the day that the escrow closed, the escrow officer told us that the new panel had been installed without a permit. After moving in, we applied for our own permit at the building department. But the new panel did not pass inspection. We emailed copies of the failed inspection notice to the sellers, their agent, and our agent, but no one has responded. What should we do? Niki

Dear Niki: According to the National Electrical Code and the International Residential Code, it is illegal to perform electrical installations without a permit. It was the responsibility of the sellers to have this work done according to safety code requirements and with the approval of the local building department. Likewise, it was the responsibility of the agents to inform you of the status of the work before the close of escrow, not after.

If the sellers and agents are unwilling to address your concerns, a wake-up letter from a real estate attorney may be needed. Certified mail on legal stationary tends to be more stimulating than common email. Of similar effect would an ethics complaint at the local Board of Realtors office.